Sunday, April 15, 2018

Augment your hard drive with a speedy 120GB SSD for just $44 today

Augment your hard drive with a speedy 120GB SSD for just $44 today | PCWorld

Augment your hard drive with a speedy 120GB SSD for just $44 today

This would be a great boot drive for SSD newcomers.

ssdplus
SanDisk

The best upgrade you can give an aging PC is a solid-state drive, full stop. Going from a traditional hard drive to an SSD can make your computer feel like new again, but fully swapping out your spacious hard drive for a speedy SSD can get expensive. Today, Amazon has a good middle ground alternative to going all out with a dedicated SSD.

A 120GB SanDisk SSD Plus is just $44 at the online retailer today. That's the lowest price yet for this $65 SSD, though it's been hovering between $50 and $55 for a while. Still, $44 for an entry-level SSD is a stellar price, especially for one from a big-name storage brand.

The capacity clearly isn't enough for most people's needs, but this little SSD would be a great boot drive for people who already have a hard drive in a desktop PC, or in a laptop with a storage expansion slot. The end result would be a hybrid setup with Windows and your most-used programs sitting on the SSD—and enjoying blisteringly fast SSD speeds—while most of your documents, media, and other files reside on the secondary hard drive. We've got a tutorial on how to move your Windows installation to an SSD if you need help.

This drive is very basic as SSDs go. It doesn't have any of the fancier features we see nowadays, such as 3D NAND or the teeny-tiny M.2 form factor. Still, this 2.5-inch drive promises performance that is 20 times faster than a hard drive. The change in boot times alone will be noticeable even with an aging Windows 7 computer.

Once you've experienced the wonders of life with an SSD, our round-up of the best SSDs of 2018 can lead help you kit out your system with even faster and more spacious options.

[Today's deal: 120GB SanDisk SSD Plus for $44 at Amazon.]

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Ian is an independent writer based in Israel who has never met a tech subject he didn't like. He primarily covers Windows, PC and gaming hardware, video and music streaming services, social networks, and browsers. When he's not covering the news he's working on how-to tips for PC users, or tuning his eGPU setup.

  • Master of Science in Information Systems — online and on campusOnline Master of Science in Information Systems at Northwestern University
  • Report: Google's Gmail will soon include a time-limited Confidential Mode, UI redesign

    Report: Google's Gmail will soon include a time-limited Confidential Mode, UI redesign | PCWorld

    Report: Google's Gmail will soon include a time-limited Confidential Mode, UI redesign

    You may see this new version of Google's Gmail by early May.

    gmail logo large
    Google

    As part of a Gmail redesign expected soon, Google is adding a new Confidential Mode as well as a sidebar that will display the calendar next to email messages, according to a report.

    It isn't clear when the new Gmail will be available, though The Verge reports that it incorporates several features that are already a part of its mobile app, including the "quick reply" feature that allows you to select from a few canned response, as well as the ability to snooze emails. More dramatic changes include the ability to add a sidebar to explore your calendar or notes taken in Google Keep. 

    The sidebar also appears to allow users to essentially work within two apps simultaneously, instead of, say, flipping between a calendar and email tab.

    What's more interesting, though, is a so-called Confidential Mode, a way for users to place restrictions on what can be done with emails sent to other users. The Verge reports that users will be able to set limits on whether an email they send can be forwarded, downloaded, or printed. A screenshot the site obtained also shows a popup that reads, "Content expires Dec. 6, 2018," an indication that users will be able to set time limits on how long contents can be accessed, as well. 

    What this means for you: The Verge speculates that the new Gmail will roll out sometime around when Google's developer conference begins on May 8, a day after Microsoft's own Build conference begins in Seattle. One of the features that Microsoft recently added to its own Outlook.com service was a way to prevent email you send from being forwarded. Email management could be the next front in the ongoing wars between competing email services. 

    To comment on this article and other PCWorld content, visit our Facebook page or our Twitter feed.

    As PCWorld's senior editor, Mark focuses on Microsoft news and chip technology, among other beats.

  • Master of Science in Information Systems — online and on campusOnline Master of Science in Information Systems at Northwestern University
  • What’s the difference between Ring’s Video Doorbell and Video Doorbell 2?

    What's the difference between Ring's Video Doorbell and Video Doorbell 2? | TechHive

    What's the difference between Ring's Video Doorbell and Video Doorbell 2?

    The new model is double the price, but it brings much better image quality.

    Double the money brings much better image quality.

    Ring's first-generation video doorbell is now half the price of its second-generation model, thanks to a recent price cut. So which one should you choose?

    The single biggest difference between the two is in video quality. The earlier model outputs a 720p video image while the second-generation doorbell provides 1080p. There's also been some improvements in video processing, because the picture from the newer doorbell is significantly better. That helps explain the price difference.

    In the video above, we have clips from both doorbells and the difference is quite surprising.

    template c100.00 02 29 17.still001 Martyn Williams/IDG

    Images from Ring's Video Doorbell (left) and Video Doorbell 2.

    There have also been improvements in night vision, movement detection, and the second-generation model features a removable battery. That last improvement will make life easier if you don't have existing doorbell wiring (the original also has a battery, but you must remove it from the wall and take into the house to charge it).

    Whichever model you choose, remember the optional monthly operating costs: Ring charges $3 per month per camera or doorbell. If you have four or more Ring devices, there's a $10-per-month subscription that covers an unlimited number of devices. Annual subscriptions bring a discount at $30 per device or $100 for unlimited devices.

    To comment on this article and other TechHive content, visit our Facebook page or our Twitter feed.

    Martyn Williams covers technology news for IDG and is based in San Francisco. He was previously based in Tokyo.

    Windows malware opens RDP ports on PCs for future remote access

    https://www.zdnet.com/article/windows-malware-opens-rdp-ports-on-pcs-for-future-remote-access/